Asalha Puja

Buddha

Buddha

My family and I went to the Asalha Puja celebration at the Forest Hermitage yesterday. This is a celebration of the Buddha’s first sermon following his enlightenment. This sermon is sometimes referred to as the  ‘setting into motion the wheel of dharma’.

The hermitage is located in the beautiful English countryside, with wonderful gardens and Buddha statues all over the place. There are also signs with meaningful quotes and sayings. One sign said “Remember you don’t meditate to get anything, but to get rid of things. We do it, not with desire, but with letting go”. Now, that sounds reasonable, sure. But if we think deeply about what it is telling us, we may realize that we may assume that we meditate to obtain Enlightenment but this is ‘to get something’! Meditation with a goal is ‘incorrect’! But how do we meditate without goal? How does meditation get rid of things?  Hmm, maybe it is telling us that Enlightenment is not obtained through desiring it, but naturally blossoms when we get rid of things, such as our ego-mind. So, we meditate without desire, without goal, and we can do it through the process of ‘letting go’.

Letting it all drop away and simply sitting, meditating. What can burden us when we dropped it all on the floor?! lol.

Have you ever seen something out of the corner of your eye, and without turning your head, you turn your eyes to see it and then it is no longer is in view? Sometimes trying to look directly at something makes it invisible. Sometimes thinking it may be just around the corner, makes it forever run around the next corner. Sometimes simply letting go of the seeking, enables our Ox to come into focus.

Say that again please and I will listen carefully.

Say that again please and I will listen carefully.

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10 thoughts on “Asalha Puja

    • Thank you Sue. Learning to let go is hard work but the simplest thing at the same time. 🙂 I was honored to be at the celebration. It was wonderful even though I had to leave before the end.

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  1. ‘Sometimes trying to look directly at something makes it invisible.’

    Indeed so; perhaps we could describe it as the process of the mind attempting to represent in awareness what cannot be represented but is rather awareness itself?

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